Rev Xtreme as being a Health Supplement

Around the Rev Xtreme website, the designers from the supplement declare that taking it can result in a, “perfect physique, stronger muscles, and greater stamina”, improved, “efficiency,” and, “greater stamina”. Upon closer inspections of the ingredients contained in Rev Xtreme, it becomes fairly clear the company’s claims are exaggerated. While Rev Xtreme website features a powerful, effective supplement, the label of ingredients suggests otherwise. First, it is very important evaluate this product from your cost perspective. When thinking about the product’s nutrition label, there are actually the following ingredients: Calcium, folic acid, vitamin C, beet extract (150mg), and what muscle rev xtreme reviews calls an “Elite NO2 Blend”, consists of L-citrulline, lovage powder, co q10, L-taurine, and L-norvaline.

To start with, many of the product’s ingredients can be found in a normal multivitamin for a fraction of the price. For instance, amazon.com lists Rev Xtreme at $.43 cents per pill, while a kirkland signature “daily multi” (containing calcium, ascorbic acid, and folic acid, among a number of other necessary nutrient elements) shows up at $.03 cents per pill. The supplement also boasts “150mg beet extract nitrates”, which might initially look like an effective amount. This is simply not the case. In accordance with an article posted in livestrong.com, one beet contains 200mg of nitrates, and a cupful of beetroot juice contains around 700mg.

Therefore, this supplement contains roughly 3/4 of one beet’s worth of nitrates, which, according to research referenced by runnersworld.com, is not near enough. Based on the study, it took about 500mL (or 2 cups) of beetroot juice to yield athletic benefits. To conclude, while it’s true why these basic ingredients may indeed improve all-around health in the right quantities, you ought to look elsewhere to get a less expensive. An in depth inspection of Rev Xtreme’s more “exotic” ingredients (contained in the product’s “Elite NO2 Blend”) is also neccesary. In the first place, the “Elite NO2 Blend” is proprietary, meaning that it’s impossible to understand how much of each one ingredient the product or service contains. It is really an automatic reason for suspicion, because of the mostly unregulated nature of the supplement industry.

Oftentimes, companies will add a disproportionate quantity of the most affordable ingredient (often sugar), and minimal amounts of the other, more costly ingredients. Within this product, the proprietary blend contains just 1020 milligrams of total ingredients, that is far less than an efficient dose of l-citrulline alone (according to a survey provided by the British Journal of Nutrition referenced in livestrong.com, a highly effective dose was approximately 6g). In conclusion, though it may be impossible to understand for certain whether some of the ingredients listed have been in effective dosages, evidence points to the contrary. As far as side-effects go, the item is fairly safe. WebMD lists lovage, l-citrulline, l-taurine, and coenzyme q10, as “possibly” or “likely” safe for children and adults. L-norvaline had less information, and as outlined by Dr. Ray Sahelian, M.D., “no claims can be produced regarding the benefit or side-effect of L-norvaline supplementation”. Overall, there’s not much evidence to suggest that muscle rev xtreme review is harmful, one should probably look for sport nutrition of higher value if you’re hunting for a truly effective supplement.

Sources:
1. http://www.livestrong.com/article/412812-beetroot-supplement-vs-beetroot-juice/
2. http://www.runnersworld.com/sweat-science/beet-juice-how-much-and-when
3. http://www.livestrong.com/article/506429-effective-dosages-of-l-arginine-l-citrulline/
4. http://www.webmd.com/search/search_results/default.aspx?sourceType=all&query=novolin
5. http://www.raysahelian.com/norvaline.html